Holly Yashi opening a restaurant at former ACRC building next door

Holly Hosterman, Paul Lubitz and members of the Holly Yashi crew in the  former ACRC thrift shop. This will be the site of the new restaurant and ciderworks. The crew doesn't always dress this way; it was Casual Friday (on Oct. 31). KLH | Union

Paul Lubitz, Holly Hosterman and members of the Holly Yashi crew in the former ACRC thrift shop. This will be the site of the new restaurant and ciderworks. The crew doesn't always dress this way; it was Casual Friday (on Oct. 31). KLH | Union

Kevin L. Hoover
Mad River Union

ARCATA – A year from now, you’ll be able to do some shopping, have dinner, attend a concert and cap it off with a tangy beverage – all in Arcata’s Creamery District.

The district, whose capitol building is the former Golden State Milk Products Creamery, has been reimagining itself as an “art and commerce” neighborhood with visioning sessions, grants, festivals and more for the past few years.

Now, a major investment by one of the district’s industrial/retail linchpins is making possible a whole new dimension in Creamery District living.

Six words: Holly Yashi is opening a restaurant.

The new eatery will occupy the former Arcata Community Recycling Center (ACRC) thirft store on the jewelrymaker’s western border.

A conceptual layout of a fully developed Creamery District. Image by Kash Boodjeh Architects/courtesy Holly Yashi

A conceptual layout of a fully developed Creamery District. Image by Kash Boodjeh Architects/courtesy Holly Yashi

Along with maturing the district’s art and commerce theme, the new restaurant continues the iconic Arcata jewelrymaker’s diversification. Having already opened a successful retail shop in its factory, the new restaurant will now be accessible from its grounds.

“The Creamery District is happening, but to really make it happen, you need food,” said Holly Yashi co-founder Paul Lubitz. “I think it’s the one missing piece.”

That will cost a serious piece of change, what with costs for design, construction, plumbing, ADA and other improvements. “It’s big checkbook stuff,” Lubitz said.

Holly Yashi is working with an established area restaurateur to open an Arcata version of his restaurant at the site.

The restaurant owner asked not to be identified, as he is “still analyzing and debating” as to whether to go ahead with the project. But he said he is leaning “60/40” in favor.

Lubitz and co-owner Holly Hosterman laughed at the suggestion that the new dining facility be called “Holly Yummies,” but that’s not likely.

“It’ll be tasteful,” Lubitz said. He said he might mount some of his vintage motorcycles on the restaurant’s walls.

Lubitz said one major impediment was simply locating a competent manager for the business.

Another important component is more settled. Integrated into the restaurant will be Wrangletown Cider Company, offering cider and wine. The Back Porch reclamation and reuse shop will remain in the old ACRC offices.

The covered part of the former recycling dropoff area could feature outdoor dining and music.

It’s not clear when all of this will become real, but plans are advancing and Lubitz and Hosterman are clearly excited about the tasteful, tasty new adddition to the neighborhood.

“Now there’s something for everyone,” Lubitz said.

Holly Yashi, at 1300 Ninth St., holds its fourth Store Anniversary Sale Saturday, Nov. 8 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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